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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 21-25

Reduction mammoplasty in a developing country: A 10-year review (2001-2010) at the national orthopaedic hospital, Enugu


1 Department of Surgery, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria
2 Department of Plastic Surgery, National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Chimaobi Isiguzo
Department of Surgery, Plastic Surgery Unit, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Parklane, Enugu
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1117-6806.152719

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Context: Large breast is a major problem because of associated symptomatology and aesthetic concerns. Reduction mammoplasty (RM) resolves the symptom and at the same time improves the aesthetic appearance of the breast, hence improving self-esteem and social integration. Aims: To describe the pattern of RM in a hospital in the developing world and its impact on postgraduate surgical training. Settings and Design: A retrospective review of all the RMs done in the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu (a major plastic surgery training center in Nigeria) over a ten-year period (2001-2010), in the developing country of Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: All RMs done in the hospital were reviewed after retrieving their records from operation register and medical records department. Fifteen (15) cases were retrieved and analyzed. Data Analysis: Data was analyzed with Microsoft excel 2007. Results: Average age of female patients who had RM was 26.5 years and 83.3% were single. The most common complaint was abnormally large breast (macromastia). Inferior pedicle technique was commonly used. Conclusions: The results of RM are remarkable as it impact positively on the quality of life of the patients. However, the level of awareness about the availability of this service is still low in the region as shown by few cases done over the period of review and this impacts negatively on the training. The need for public awareness cannot be overemphasized.


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