Nigerian Journal of Surgery

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 71--75

Crash characteristics and pattern of motorcycle related facial bone fractures in a sub-urban Nigerian teaching hospital


Obitade S Obimakinde1, Oyebanji A Olajuyin2, Taopheeq B Rabiu3, Olusoji J Olanrewaju4 
1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
2 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
3 Department of Surgery, Neurological Surgery Unit, Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria
4 Department of Family Dentistry, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Obitade S Obimakinde
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti
Nigeria

Context: Recent studies indicated that significant proportion of facial fractures attributed to road traffic mishaps in the middle- and low-income countries are caused by motorcycle (MC) crashes. However, there is limited information on crash characteristics of such injuries. This study was designed to examine the crash characteristics, pattern of fracture, and sociodemographics of patients with facial bone fractures due to MC crashes in our institution. Subjects and Methods: Data on patients' sociodemographics, pattern of presentation, type(s) of fracture, patient status, crash characteristics, level of consciousness, and treatment offered were collected and analyzed. Results: A total of 151 patients, aged 7–59 years were reviewed during the study period. A male preponderance was observed (M:F = 4:1) and the patients were predominantly motorcyclists (64.8%, n = 98). The most common mechanism of crash was collision with another MC (51.6%, n = 78). A total of 194 fractures were reviewed and the mandible (58.8%, n = 114) was more commonly affected than the midface (41.2%, n = 80). The predominant site on the mandible was the body (31.6%) while zygoma (32.5%) was the most affected part of the midface. Patient status was found to have a statistically significant relationship with loss of consciousness (P = 0.02). Eighty-two fracture sites (42.3%) were managed with open reduction and internal fixation. Conclusions: Facial bone fractures occur in a significant proportion of MC crashes and riders are predominantly affected. In addition, a larger proportion of commuters rarely wear crash helmet which could have offered protection. Continual advocacy on preventive measures and enforcement of road safety regulations is hereby advised.


How to cite this article:
Obimakinde OS, Olajuyin OA, Rabiu TB, Olanrewaju OJ. Crash characteristics and pattern of motorcycle related facial bone fractures in a sub-urban Nigerian teaching hospital.Niger J Surg 2018;24:71-75


How to cite this URL:
Obimakinde OS, Olajuyin OA, Rabiu TB, Olanrewaju OJ. Crash characteristics and pattern of motorcycle related facial bone fractures in a sub-urban Nigerian teaching hospital. Niger J Surg [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 Jun 18 ];24:71-75
Available from: http://www.nigerianjsurg.com/article.asp?issn=1117-6806;year=2018;volume=24;issue=2;spage=71;epage=75;aulast=Obimakinde;type=0