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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 4-6

Pattern and survival of biliary atresia patients; Experience in Southern Nigeria


1 Department of Surgery, Pediatric Surgery Unit, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt; Department of Surgery, Pediatric Surgery Unit, Imo State University Teaching Hospital, Orlu; Department of Surgery, Federal Medical Centre, Owerri, Imo State, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
2 Department of Surgery, Pediatric Surgery Unit, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
3 Department of Pediatrics, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Philemon E Okoro
Department of Surgery, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, PMB 6173
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1117-6806.111495

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Background: Biliary atresia (BA) has been a challenge to surgeons worldwide. Beyond the revolutionary surgical technique popularised by Kasai, liver transplantation has added renewed hope in the long-term outcome. In Nigeria, where late presentation is very common, there is need to assess the long-term results of the treatment options available to us. Aim: We aimed to evaluate the presentation and management outcome of BA and the long-term survival of BA patients seen in our practice. Materials and Methods: Cases of BA seen between January 2007 and December 2011 in three tertiary health facilities in South East Nigeria were included. Data obtained included age at presentation, clinical features, treatment offered and age at the time of death. Analysis was with the SPSS 17.0. Results: Twenty four patients comprising 10 (41.7%) males and 14 (58.3%) females were included in the study. The mean age of presentation was 4.02 (±214) months; range 1.75-11.0 months. Fifteen (62.5%) patients had surgery while 9 (37.5%) received medical treatment only. The mean age at death was 14.2 (±8.1) months; range 2.5-30 months. Conclusion: BA poses a daunting challenge in our practice. Outcome of treatment is still discouraging. We identified late presentation, lack of facilities to make early diagnosis, lack of adequately trained manpower to manage these children and lack of post-operative care and support for patients as the major challenges in the management of BA children in our region.


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